The book on: QB Jake Locker

Jake Locker (Scott Kennedy/Scout.com)

With Jake Locker getting praise for his pro-day performance Wednesday, it might be time for an amazingly extensive review of his accomplishments as the Vikings consider their quarterback options. See what Dave-Te Thomas' series of in-depth draft profiles is all about.

JACOB "Jake" COOPER LOCKER
Quarterback
University of Washington Huskies
#10
6:02.4-231
Ferndale, Washington
Ferndale High School

OVERVIEW

Regarded by many talent evaluators as one of the finest athletes in college football, Locker made a successful return to the gridiron as a senior after first considering entering the 2010 NFL Draft. He was also in high demand as a baseball player, having signed a six-year contract with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim in 2009 after twice being selected in the major league baseball draft during his prep and college careers as an outfielder and pitcher.

Locker actually returned to Washington as a walk-on for his final campaign, as the Angels paid his scholarship costs during the 2010 semester. He was originally selected in the 40th round of by the Angels as a senior in 2006 coming out of Ferndale High School, as that organization again tabbed him in the tenth round of the 2009 draft to play centerfield in their minor league system.

Prior to donning the Angels' colors in 2009, Locker played outfield for the Bellingham Bells of the West Coast Collegiate Baseball League in 2008, where he was named by Baseball America as the league's top prospect. But, on the fourth day of practice going into that season, he partially tore his hamstring and did not resume full practices until mid-August of that campaign, playing in ten games, hitting .273 with one home run while playing center field before returning to the university, for 2008 football fall camp.

After Locker was selected by the Angels in 2009, he mulled their offer throughout the summer, eventually signing with the organization for a $300,000 bonus in mid-August after meeting with officials from the team earlier in the month along with his father, Scott, who handled the negotiations.

The agreement came two days before the deadline to sign players who were taken in the June draft, as the state of Washington Class 3A Baseball Player of the Year in 2006 was told by the team to put away his pitcher's glove and would be groomed as their future center fielder.

At the time of his signing, Locker said he didn't want to go into details of the contract but that it was "kind of vague" as to whether there were any commitments to do anything baseball-related down the road. But there was apparently nothing in the deal that precludes him from playing football, even though the Angels own Locker's rights for the next six years and should he want to play baseball at any point during that time, he would have to play for them.

"It was just an opportunity that presented itself and it was something I didn't believe would take away from me as a football player here," Locker said after UW's August, 2009 practice. "I want to play football and that's what I'm going to put my focus into and the Angels have been great with me, worked with me, and they understand that and we'll go from there."

As for whether he might play baseball in the future, Locker said that was uncertain. "That's something we will just have to deal with when we get there," he said. "We just worried about getting the contract done and they just told me to focus on the 2009 season and that would be something we will talk about after the season."

Locker's situation was similar to that of former Oregon quarterback Dennis Dixon, who was drafted in the fifth round by the Atlanta Braves in 2007. Dixon was reported to have received a $150,000 signing bonus. Locker's signing bonus was enough to pay for his final two years of tuition at Washington. By signing, he maintained his eligibility in football but he had to pay his own way and was officially termed a walk-on as a junior and senior, opening up a scholarship for the Huskies.

Scott Locker said that as of now, Jake does not plan to try to juggle both sports. However, he also noted that nothing is set. "Obviously, there's a chance," he noted. "I don't think that's going to happen, but it's always out there." Locker continued to concentrate on football in 2010, bypassing a chance to go to spring training with the Angels to participate in Washington's preseason camps prior to his final gridiron campaign.

"He's a fabulous kid," Angels scouting director Eddie Bane told the Los Angeles Times. "He's a great leader with great ability. We want to keep the taste of baseball in his mouth until he makes a final decision." Some baseball scouts have long felt he may have just as good a future, if not potentially better, on the diamond than the gridiron.

One anonymous scout was quoted in Baseball America magazine earlier this year saying Locker "could be a potential Hall of Famer" on the diamond. He's also viewed as a potential first round draftee in football, though he did not progress the way football evaluators expected under UW head coach Steve Sarkisian.

At Ferndale High School, Locker was one of four Seattle Times "Blue Chip" recruits, ranking fifth nationally at quarterback and first in the West, by Prep Star. He also ranked 85th in Scout.com's National "Hot 100", 68th overall and fourth among "dual-threat" quarterbacks in Rivals.com's national ranking charts. In addition to quarterback, he played four years as a defensive back and was the first freshman ever to start in coach Vic Randall's 21-year career.

Locker started at cornerback during his freshman season. The following year, he threw for 713 yards with nine touchdowns, while running for 478 yards and three scores after taking over as the starting quarterback in the Golden Eagles' "Wing-T" offense, leading the team to a 10-2 record. He also moved to safety on defense. Locker directed Ferndale to the second round of the 3A state playoffs before the team was defeated by O'Dea, 31-0.

He passed for 1,314 yards and 16 touchdowns while rushing for 987 yards and 15 scores in 2004, leading Ferndale to a 13-2 record and a Washington 3A state runner-up finish. In the state title game, the Golden Eagles fell to nationally-ranked prep powerhouse Bellevue, 31-28. Locker was named first-team All-State by the Associated Press that season, adding All-State accolades as a pitcher and outfielder for the school's baseball team.

Locker led his team to a 14-0 record and a state title in 2005, throwing for 1,603 yards and 25 touchdowns with only three interceptions. An excellent running quarterback, he also rushed for 1,339 yards and 24 scores during his senior year, earning first-team All-American honors from Parade and EA Sports.

Locker was also named the Class 3A state Player of the Year by the Associated Press and Seattle Times, adding first-team All-State honors from both organizations. In the 2005 Washington 3A state title game, he had four touchdowns and 272 total yards in a 47-12 win over Prosser High School. He helped Ferndale to a seventh place ranking in USA Today's final West Region rankings, and the team ranked 12th in MaxPreps.com's final national rankings.

Locker was one of the nation's most highly regarded recruits and received scholarship offers from countless universities including Arizona State, California, Oregon, Oregon State, Stanford, Tennessee, Southern California and Washington State. He faced a tough decision over whether to pursue a career in professional baseball or accept an offer to play college football. Ultimately, he decided to follow football and stayed in-state as he signed with the Huskies.

"I checked out Oregon State and just loved it there," Locker said. "They have a great staff and I loved the campus but I just felt in my heart Washington was the place for me. To be honest, Washington has been in my heart for awhile now and I know I said location wasn't a factor but the more I thought about it, it was a huge factor."

"I'm very close to my family and I have a lot of friends here. The chance to play in front of them and have them see me play in person was huge. I love the area and I had been praying about this for a long time and feel God had put this on my heart. Like I said, Oregon State was a great school but Washington is the place for me."

Locker enrolled at Washington in 2006 and retained eligibility by redshirting his first year. He spent the season quarterbacking the scout team, and even won UW's Pepsi Player of the Week Award for his work in preparing the team for games vs. Fresno State, Arizona and Washington State. He made the travel squad for every game and suited up for all 12, but didn't see any game action.

The red-shirt freshman took over the reins as Washington's starting quarterback in 2007 and relied heavily on his athletic gifts. Former head coach Tyrone Willingham allowed him to take full advantage of his running ability and the results were stunning. He started 12 games and rushed for 986 yards and 13 touchdowns on 172 carries (5.73 ypc), setting new Pac-10 Conference and UW records for rushing yards by a quarterback.

On November 10th, 2007, Locker was injured during a game vs. Oregon State, and was removed from the field by an ambulance and taken to Good Samaritan Hospital in Corvallis, Oregon. He was able to return to the stadium in the fourth quarter to watch the end of the game, though he was wearing a neck brace. He would be forced to sit out the team's following contest, vs. California, due to the neck injury,

Locker also completed 155-of-328 pass attempts (47.26%) for 2,062 yards with 14 touch-downs and 15 interceptions while leading the Huskies to a 4-8 record. He was named the Pac-10 Conference Freshman of the Year and was an All-Pac-10 honorable mention selection. He was also named to the Rivals.com Freshman All-American second-team.

He set UW records for rushing yards in a season by a freshman (986), rushing yards in a season by a quarterback (which is also a Pac-10 record), rushing attempts by a quarter-back (172), passing yards by a freshman, touchdown passes by a freshman and longest pass completion (98 yards to Marcel Reece vs. Arizona).

The quarterback spent the majority of his sophomore season watching helplessly on the sideline as the Huskies produced a winless season. Locker started the first four games of the season before suffering a broken right thumb while trying to register a block vs. Stanford. In the Huskies' second game of the season vs. Brigham Young, with the Huskies trailing 28-21, he scored a rushing touchdown with two seconds remaining to bring the score to 28-27.

After tumbling into the end zone, Locker threw the ball up into the air and was assessed a 15-yard unsportsmanlike conduct penalty. This backed the point after touchdown kick, which was to tie the game and in all likelihood send it to overtime, from the 3-yard line to the 18-yard line. The kick was blocked and UW lost the game by that 28-27 margin.

The call was seen as controversial, in that it followed the letter of the rule dictating that players who score a touchdown must hand the ball over to officials in an orderly fashion but some believe violated its spirit, because Locker's act of throwing the ball was simply an emotional reaction to a big play and not an attempt to taunt his opponents or delay the game. He later apologized for incurring the penalty.

The Huskies finished 0-12 in the 2008 season, as Locker ended his abbreviated season hitting on 50-of-93 passes (53.76%) for 512 yards and one touchdown, adding 180 yards and three touchdowns on 56 carries. Willingham was fired at season's end and replace with Southern California assistant coach Steve Sarkisian.

Sarkisian brought a pro-style system that focused more on Locker's passing ability rather than his athleticism. The quarterback returned from his thumb injury and started all 12 games in 2009. The change in scheme was evident in his production, as he completed 230-of-395 passes (58.23%) for 2,800 yards with 21 touchdowns and 11 interceptions, all of which were career-bests. For his performance in 2009, Jake Locker was named Male Sports Star of the Year in the 75th annual Seattle Sports Star of the Year awards.[

On September 19th, 2009, Locker led the unranked Washington Huskies to a 16-13 win over third-ranked Southern California. Late in the fourth quarter, he engineered a 68-yard drive that ended with a 22-yard field goal with three seconds remaining that put the Huskies up 16-13. The win allowed the Huskies to move to 24th in the Associated Press poll, the first time they had been ranked since the 2003 season.

He was named a semifinalist for the Davey O'Brien Quarterback Award and was an All-Pac-10 Conference honorable mention selection that season. He added 388 yards and seven touchdowns on 112 carries, and was the recipient of the Guy Flaherty Most Inspirational Award, the Huskies' oldest and most prestigious team honor.

Locker and the Huskies would go on to have an up and down season, finishing with a 5-7 record. When Washington's 2009 season came to a close with a decisive 42-10 victory over 19th-ranked California, chants of "one more year, one more year," could already be heard echoing throughout Husky Stadium.

The sound was UW fans pleading with Locker to return for his senior season. Locker did not disappoint the Husky faithful, as he announced on December 19th that he would bypass the chance to be one of the top selections in the 2010 National Football League Draft to return for his final season of eligibility.

"The only reason for going was because there's a lot of money involved. I didn't care about that. That's not what it's about for me. I want to enjoy what I'm doing. So when I looked at it that way, it was a real easy decision for me," Locker said.

"I wanted to make a decision I wasn't going to regret 30 years from now. I wanted to make a decision I was going to be able to live with. I knew I hadn't done what I set out to do when I came here. And I felt that the opportunity I had with the team coming back was a pretty good one."

After bypassing the 2010 NFL draft, many viewed Jake Locker as a shoo-in to become the top overall selection in the 2011 draft. However, a lackluster senior season caused many scouts to sour on the Husky signal caller, leaving them to wonder if his talent will ever translate to the professional level.

Locker was expected to make similar strides as a passer in his senior season to those seen in 2009 – his first year under the tutelage of Steve Sarkisian. Fresh off a campaign in which he completed a career-high 58.23 percent of his passes, scouts had hoped he would continue to improve his erratic accuracy. The results would prove otherwise, as Locker completed just 55.42 percent of his throws while remaining largely inconsistent.

He entered the season with much hype and was named to preseason watch lists for the Davey O'Brien Quarterback Award and the Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award. He was also considered a strong contender for the Heisman Trophy. Locker's senior season didn't go quite as planned and his production fell, but the quarterback was able to fulfill the promise he made when he returned for his senior year and led Washington to a bowl game – the Huskies' first since 2002.

As a pocket passer, Locker was exposed for having marginal field vision, a tendency to stare down receivers and often force the ball into traffic. In 2010, 43 of his 332 pass attempts (12.95%) resulted in either a pass deflection or an interception. He finished his career on an upbeat note, leading the team to a 19-7 victory over Nebraska in the Holiday Bowl, gaining revenge for the Huskers trouncing the Huskies, 56-21, when the teams met earlier in September.

Locker went on to complete 184-of-332 passes for 2,265 yards, 17 touchdowns and nine interceptions. He scored six more times while amassing 385 yards on 114 carries (3.38 ypc) in the twelve games he started, sitting out the Oregon clash after suffering a broken rib in the Huskies' clash with Oregon State. The team captain was named All-Pac 10 honorable mention.

He also became just the fourth player to capture the Guy Flaherty Most Inspirational Award twice in the in the 103-year history that the honor has been handed out. He joined Tom Ward (1911-12), Don Mcketa (1959-60) and Jordan Reffett (2006-07) as the only players in school history to win the award more than once.

In the 40 games that he appeared in and started for Washington, Locker amassed 9,578 yards in total offense to rank second all-time on the school's record list behind Cody Pickett (10,103; 1999-03), as that mark is also good for 11th on the Pacific-10 Conference record list. His 7,639 aerial yards and 53 touchdown passes also placed second in Husky history (Pickett; 10,220) and 26th in conference annals.

Known throughout the country for his ability as a runner, Locker gained 1,939 yards on 454 attempts (4.27 ypc), shattering Marques Tuiasosopo's previous school quarterback rushing records (1,495 yards on 377 carries; 2997-00). As a freshman, he set a Pacific-10 conference record by rushing for 986 yards – the most ever by a quarterback. His 29 touchdown runs are tied for third in school annals among all ball carriers.

CAREER NOTES
Locker started all 40 games at Washington, completing 619-of-1,148 passes (53.92%) for 7,639 yards, 53 touchdowns and 35 interceptions, holding a career passer rating of 118.95…Scored 29 times on 454 carries for 1,939 yards (4.27 ypc)…Amassed 9,578 yards in total offense on 1,602 plays (5.98 avg), averaging 239.45 yards per game…Among NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision active players, Locker ranks 12th for pass attempts, 17th for pass completions, 16th for yards passing, tied for 18th for touchdown tosses, tenth for interceptions, seventh for total plays participated in, ninth for total offensive yardage and tied for eighth for touchdowns responsible for (82)…His 1,148 pass attempts rank second only to Cody Pickett (1,429; 1999-2003) on Washington's career-record list…His 619 completions are also topped only by Pickett (821) in school annals…His 7,639 passing yards place second all-time at Washington behind Pickett's 10,220 and 26th in Pac-10 Conference history…Passed for 200 yards or more 20 times, the second most in school history to Pickett's 29…Tied Brock Huard (1996-98) for second in school annals with 53 touchdown passes, as that mark is just shy of Pickett's school record (55) and ranks 26th in Pac-10 Conference history…Accumulated 9,578 yards in total offense, ranking second on the school's record list behind only Pickett (10,103) and 11th in Pac-10 Conference history…His 1,602 total offensive attempts are also the second most in school history behind Pickett (1,685)…His .0305 interception percentage is the third-lowest in school annals, topped only by Isaiah Stanback (.0229; 2003-06) and Mark Brunell (.0302; 1989-92)…The quarterback holds a career passer rating of 118.95, ranking ninth in school history behind Damon Huard (130.3; 1992-95), Tom Flick (130.0; 1976-80), Brock Huard (129.7), Billy Joe Hobert (129.3; 1990-92), Pickett (124.1), Brunell (123.6), Stanback (122.9), Marques Tuiasosopo (122.6; 1997-2000) and Don Heinrich (122.4; 1949-50, 52)…His 454 rushing attempts and 1,939 yards on the ground are most by a quarterback in school history…Rushed for 29 touchdowns, tying Rashaan Shehee (29; 1994-97) for third among all runners on the school's record list, surpassed only by Napoleon Kaufman (34; 1991-94) and Joe Steele (32; 1976-79)…Gained 3,188 yards in total offense in 2009, ranking as the second-most on the school's single-season record list behind only Cody Pickett (4,273, 2002)…His 388 yards rushing in 2009 rank as the sixth-highest season total by a quarter-back in Washington history, while his 385 yards in 2010 placed seventh…His 2,265 aerial yards in 2010 placed 14th on the school's annual record list and his 2,800 yards passing as a junior is good for third on the UW annual record chart behind Cody Pickett (4,458 in 2002, 3,043 in 2003)…Averaged 233.33 passing yards per game in 2009, ranking fourth on the Husky season-record chart behind Pickett (342.9 in 2002, 253.6 in 2003, 245.1 in 2001)…His 21 touchdown passes in 2009 rank fourth in school season history behind Pickett (28, 2002), Brock Huard (25, 1997) and Billy Joe Hobert (24, 1991)…Averaged 1.75 touchdown passes per game as a junior, ranking fourth in school history behind Huard (2.27, 1997), Pickett (2.15, 2002) and Hobert (2.00, 1991)…His 129.75 passer rating in 2009 rank eight in school annals behind Brock Huard (153.76, 1997), Damon Huard (143.61, 1995), Heinrich (143.56, 1950), Hobert (142.04, 1991), Warren Moon (133.08, 1977), Tom Flick (132.02, 1980) and Pickett (131.35, 2002)…His 56-yard touchdown run vs. Arizona in 2009 ranks as the fifth-longest run by a quarterback in school history…His 507 total offensive attempts as a junior rank third on the school's single-season record list behind Cody Pickett (698 in 2002, 534 in 2003)…Gained 3,188 yards in total offense in 2009, ranking as the second-most on the school's season-record list behind Pickett (4,273, 2002)…His 372 yards in total offense vs. Louisiana State in 2009 is the ninth-most in school history for a single game…His 98-yard touchdown pass to Marcel Reece vs. Arizona in 2007 shattered the school's previous record for longest pass play, an 89-yarder from Cody Pickett to Reggie Williams vs. San Jose State in 2002, and ranks as the third-longest pass in conference annals…For his career, 335-of-619 pass completions (54.12%) went for first downs, converting 120-of-328 third-down attempts (36.59%)…290 of his pass completions (46.85%) went for gains of at least 10 yards, including 100 that went for 20 yards or longer (16.16%)…230-of-1,148 pass attempts (20.03%) resulted in either a sack, pass deflection, or interception…Also rushed for 154 first downs and converted 52-of-125 third-down carries (41.60%)…Had a pair of receptions for 15 yards.

2010 SEASON
All-Pac-10 honorable mention selection…Member of Watch Lists for the Davey O'Brien (Top Quarterback) and Johnny Unitas Golden Arm (Top Senior Quarterback) Awards…Recipient of the Guy Flaherty Most Inspirational Award for the second-straight season, joining Tom Ward (1911-12), Don Mcketa (1959-60) and Jordan Reffett (2006-07) as the only players in school history to win the award more than once…The team captain started 12 games, missing only the Oregon contest with a broken rib suffered in the Oregon State clash…The Huskies posted a 7-6 overall record while Locker completed 184-of-332 pass attempts (55.42%) for 2,265 yards, 17 touchdowns and nine interceptions…Scored six times on 114 carries for 385 yards (3.38 ypc), as he rushed for 31 first downs and converted 11-of-38 third-down carries (28.95%)…99-of-184 pass completions (53.80%) went for first downs, converting 27-of-91 third-down throws (29.67%)…88 of his pass completions (47.83%) went for gains of at least 10 yards, including 27 that went for 20 yards or more (14.67%)…62-of-332 pass attempts (18.68%) resulted in either a sack, pass deflection, or interception…Accumulated 2,650 yards in total offense on 446 plays (5.94 avg)…Averaged 188.75 aerial yards per game, ranking 65th nationally…Averaged 220.83 yards in total offense per game, placing seventh in the Pac-10 and 52nd in the NCAA…His passing efficiency rating of 124.20 ranked eighth in the conference and 73rd nationally… Locker's 114 rushing attempts tied for ninth on the school's season-record chart for attempts by a quarterback…His 385 yards rushing are the seventh-highest season total by a quarterback in Washington history…His 2,265 aerial yards placed 14th on the school's annual record list…His 17 touchdown passes are the seventh-highest season total by a Husky performer…His 2,650 yards in total offense rank ninth in school season annals.

2009 SEASON
All-Pac-10 honorable mention…Semifinalist for the Davey O'Brien Quarterback Award… Member of Watch Lists for the Maxwell Award, presented annually to the most outstanding collegiate football player in America, and the Manning Award, recognizing the nation's most outstanding quarterback…Recipient of the Guy Flaherty Most Inspirational Award, Washington's oldest and most prestigious team honor…Served as a team captain, starting all 12 games, as Locker completed a career-best 230-of-395 passes (58.23%) for 2,800 yards, 21 touchdowns and 11 interceptions…Carried 112 times for 388 yards (3.46 ypc) and seven scores…On 507 offensive plays, he totaled 3,188 yards and was responsible for 28 touchdowns…His pass attempts rank fourth in school history behind Cody Pickett (612 in 2002, 454 in 2003) and Cary Conklin (404, 1989)…His average of 32.92 pass attempts per game ranks sixth in school annals behind Pickett (47.1 in 2002, 37.8 in 2003), Sonny Six-killer (36.2, 1970), Brock Huard (34.7, 1998) and Conklin (33.6, 1989)…His 230 completions rank fourth in school annals behind Pickett (365 in 2002, 257 in 2003) and Steve Pelluer (232, 1983)…Averaged 19.67 completions per game, ranking third in UW history behind only Pickett (28.1 in 2002, 21.4 in 2003)…Completed 58.23 percent of his passes, ranking 11th in school history behind Steve Pelluer (.650, 1983), Damon Huard (.635 in 1995, .589 in 1993), Don Heinrich (.604, 1950), Tom Flick (.599, 1980), Billy Joe Hobert (.599, 1991), Brock Huard (.599, 1997), Hugh Millen (.598, 1985), Pickett (.596, 2002) and Marques Tuiasosopo (.587, 1999)...Passed for 2,800 yards, ranking third on the school's season record list behind only Pickett (4,458 in 2002, 3,043 in 2003)…Averaged 233.33 passing yards per game, ranking fourth in school single-season history behind Pickett (342.9 in 2002, 253.6 in 2003, 245.1 in 2001)…His 21 touchdown passes rank fourth in school season history behind Pickett (28, 2002), Huard (25, 1997) and Hobert (24, 1991)…Averaged 1.75 touch-down passes per game, ranking fourth in school history behind Huard (2.27, 1997), Pickett (2.15, 2002) and Hobert (2.00, 1991)…Threw 11 interceptions, as his 2.78 interception percentage ranks 12th in UW annals behind Isaiah Stanback (1.59 in 2006, 2.27 in 2005), Warren Moon (1.64, 1975), Mark Brunell (1.83, 1992), Damon Huard (1.92, 1995), Steve Pelluer (2.24, 1983), Pickett (2.29 in 2002, 2.86 in 2003), Brock Huard (2.36, 1996) and Bill Douglas (2.65, 1963)…His 129.75 passer rating ranks eight in school annals behind Brock Huard (153.76, 1997), Damon Huard (143.61, 1995), Heinrich (143.56, 1950), Hobert (142.04, 1991), Warren Moon (133.08, 1977), Tom Flick (132.02, 1980) and Pickett (131.35, 2002)… Carried 112 times, ranking 11th on the school's season-record list for attempts by a quarterback…His 388 rushing yards ranks as the seventh-most in Husky history by a quarterback behind his own record (986, 2007), Dennis Fitzpatrick (697, 1974), Marques Tuiasosopo (571 in 1999, 469 in 2000), Tom Manke (483, 1967) and Mark Brunell (472, 1990)…His 56-yard touchdown run vs. Arizona ranks as the fifth-longest run by a quarter-back in school history…His 507 total offensive attempts ranks third on the school's single-season record list behind Cody Pickett (698 in 2002, 534 in 2003)…His 57 total offensive attempts vs. Louisiana State tied two other players as the 10th-most in school history for a single game…Gained 3,188 yards in total offense, ranking as the second-most on the school's single-season record list behind only Cody Pickett (4,273, 2002)…His 372 yards in total offense vs. LSU is the ninth-most in school history for a single game…Gained 6.29 yards per offensive attempt, ranking as the ninth-highest mark on the school's season record list…Earned Pac-10 Offensive Player of the Week honors vs. California.

2008 SEASON
Named to the preseason watch lists for the Maxwell Award, presented annually to the most outstanding collegiate football player, and the Manning Award, recognizing the nation's most outstanding quarterback…Started the first four games of the season before breaking his thumb vs. Stanford…Completed 50-of-93 passes attempted (53.76%) for 512 yards and one touchdown…Carried 56 times for 180 yards (3.21 ypc) and three touchdowns…Gained 692 yards in total offense on 149 plays…Earned the team's offensive player of the week award vs. Oregon and Brigham Young.

2007 SEASON
All-Pac-10 honorable mention and named the league's Freshman of the Year…First-team Redshirt Freshman All-American choice by collegesportsreport.com and second-team pick by Rivals.com…Chosen as the Sports Radio 950 KJR Player of the Year for offense… Received the Travis Spring Most Outstanding Freshman Award for offense at the team's postseason awards banquet…Started every game but one, as he sat out the California contest after a suffering an injury on a helmet-to-helmet hit a week earlier vs. Oregon State…Gained 2,062 yards with 14 touchdowns and 15 interceptions on 155-of-328 passes (47.26%), adding 986 yards with 13 more scores on a career-best 172 carries (5.73 ypc)…Totaled 3,048 yards on 500 offensive touches, as he was responsible for 27 touchdowns…Also recorded four solo tackles and caught a pass for 15 yards in the Washington State clash…His pass attempts rank ninth on the school's season-record list behind Cody Pickett (612 in 2002, 454 in 2003, 355 in 2001), Cary Conklin (404, 1989), Sonny Sixkiller (362, 1970), Steve Pelluer (357, 1983), Brock Huard (347, 1998) and Marques Tuiasosopo (345, 2000)…Averaged 27.3 pass attempts per game to rank 11th on the school's single-season record list…Set a school record for passing yards by a freshman with his 2,062 yards and 155 completions...Set another UW record for touchdown passes by a freshman with 14, as that total also tied for 13th on the single-season record list…Threw four touch-down passes vs. Oregon and UCLA, tying for second on the school's single-game record list behind Chris Rowland (5 vs. Cal, 1973)…Set a school record for longest pass play with a 98-yard touchdown to Marcel Reece vs. Arizona…Also threw an 83-yard touchdown to Anthony Russo vs. Oregon, ranking as the sixth-longest pass play in school history…Tied a school record set by Isaiah Stanback (2005) and Cody Pickett (2001, 2002) with five pass completions of 50 yards or longer…Averaged 21.4 yards per completion vs. Oregon, ranking as the fourth-highest mark for a game in school history (Min. 10 completions), as his average of 19.8 yards per completion vs. Arizona ranks eighth and his 18.7 average vs. Washington State ties for 12th…Threw three interceptions vs. Ohio State, tying for 16th on the school's game-record list…Set a school record for rushing attempts by a quarterback with 172…Set Pac-10 and UW records for rushing yards by a freshman quarterback with 986. That total also set school season records for rushing yards by a freshman and rushing yards by a quarterback and ranks 14th on the single-season record list…Tied Joe Steele's (vs. Oregon, 1976) school record for most rushing yards by a freshman in a single game with 157 vs. Arizona. That total also ranks third on the school's single-game record list for rushing yards by a quarterback behind Dennis Fitzpatrick (249 vs. Washington State, 1974) and Marques Tuiasosopo (207 vs. Stanford, 1999)…His 103 rushing yards vs. Washington State ranks seventh on the single-game record list for rushing yards by a quarterback and his 102 yards vs. Ohio State ranks eighth…Had a 47-yard rush vs. Oregon, tying as the seventh-longest rush by a quarterback in school history…Averaged 5.7 yards per carry, tying Rashaan Shehee (1995), Beno Bryant (1991), Napoleon Kaufman (1993) and Greg Lewis (1990) for sixth on the school's season record list behind Rich Alexis (6.4, 2000), Shehee (6.3, 1997), Hugh McElhenny (6.2, 1950), Kaufman (6.0, 1992) and Credell Green (6.0, 1955)…His 500 total offensive attempts ranks third on UW's single-season record list behind only Cody Pickett (698 in 2002, 534 in 2003)…Gained 3,048 yards in total offense, ranking second on the school's season record list behind only Cody Pickett (4,273, 2002)…Gained 493 yards in total offense vs. Arizona, ranking second on the school's single-game record list, as he and Wildcats quarterback Willie Tuitama (517) combined to set a Pac-10 record for the most total yards gained by two opposing players in a single game with 1,110…Averaged 254.0 offensive yards per game to rank second on the school's season record list behind Cody Pickett (328.7, 2002)…Was responsible for 162 points, ranking fourth on the school's single-season record list behind Cody Pickett (186, 2002), Mark Brunell (178, 1990) and Billy Joe Hobert (174, 1991)…Responsible for 13.5 points per game, ranking fourth on the school's single-season record…Added four solo tackles…Named the team's offensive player of the week vs. Oregon, Arizona and Washington State.

2006 SEASON
Redshirted as a first-year freshman…Quarterbacked the UW service team…Made the travel squad for every game, and suited up for all 12, but didn't see any game action…Won the team's Pepsi Player of the Week Award for his work on the service team leading up to games vs. Fresno State, Arizona and Washington State.

BASEBALL
Locker spent one season as an outfielder for the Bellingham Bells of the West Coast Collegiate Baseball League…He was drafted in the 10th-round of the 2009 Major League Baseball draft by the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim…Locker signed a six-year contract with the Angels on August 15th, 2009 that paid him approximately $300,000 as a bonus… Maintained his eligibility in football, but had to give up his scholarship and pay his own way…Participated in the Angels' minor-league baseball camp in March of 2010, per contract obligations.

2008 SEASON
Locker started 9-of-10 games for the Bellingham Bells, finishing with a .273 batting average, as he came to bat 33 times, collecting nine hits with six runs, three runs batted in, two doubles and one home run…Had a .424 slugging percentage and a .351 on-base percentage…Was walked four times and produced nine strikeouts…Successfully stole bases on 4-of-5 attempts…Handled 19 put-outs with one assist and two errors for a .909 fielding average…Named the top prospect in the West Coast Collegiate Baseball League by baseballamerica.com…Wore the #10 jersey while playing for the Bells.

INJURY REPORT
2007 Season…Sustained a neck injury after a helmet-to-helmet hit vs. Oregon State (11/10) and missed the Cal game a week later (11/17) before returning to action vs. Washington State (11/24).
2008 Season…Suffered a broken right thumb while trying to block on a running play vs. Stanford (9/27) and missed the final eight games of the season…Prior to the 2008 football campaign, Locker suffered a partially torn hamstring on his fourth March practice with the Bellingham baseball team and did not resume full practices until mid-August of that campaign, playing in ten games, hitting .273 with one home run while playing center field before returning to the university, for 2008 football fall camp.
2010 Season…Had pins removed from his right hand in May of 2010. The pins were inserted after the quarterback broke his right thumb in 2008…Missed the Oregon contest (10/16) with a broken rib that hampered him for much of the season…Also suffered a nagging thigh bruise throughout the season.

CAMPUS AGILITY TESTS
4.53 in the 40-yard dash…1.64 10-yard dash…2.65 20-yard dash…4.42 20-yard shuttle…7.09 three-cone drill…32-inch vertical jump…9'6" broad jump…Bench pressed 225 pounds 23 times…31 1/8-inch arm length…9 5/8-inch hands.

HIGH SCHOOL
Attended Ferndale (Wash.) High School, playing football for head coach Vic Randall…Led the Golden Eagles to a 37-4 overall record in three years as a starting quarterback…Also started at cornerback in his first prep year before moving to safety, becoming the first freshman to start in Randall's 21-year career as head coach…One of four Seattle Times "Blue Chip" recruits, ranking fifth nationally at quarterback and first in the West, by Prep Star…Ranked 85th in Scout.com's National "Hot 100" squad…Given a four-star rating by Rivals.com, as that recruiting service listed him as the fourth dual-threat quarterback in the nation, the 68th prospect in the country and the third-best recruit in the state of Washington…Ranked fifth nationally at quarterback and first in the West by Prep Star…As a sophomore, he threw for 713 yards with nine touchdowns, while running for 478 yards and three scores after taking over as the starting quarterback in the Golden Eagles' "Wing-T" offense, leading the team to a 10-2 record…Also moved to safety on defense, as Locker directed Ferndale to the second round of the 3A state playoffs before the team lost to O'Dea High, 31-0…Passed for 1,314 yards and 16 touchdowns while rushing for 987 yards and 15 scores in 2004, leading Ferndale to a 13-2 record and a Washington 3A state runner-up finish…In the state title game, the Golden Eagles fell to nationally-ranked prep powerhouse Bellevue, 31-28…Named first-team All-State by the Associated Press that season, adding All-State accolades as a pitcher and outfielder for the school's baseball team…Led his team to a 14-0 record and a state title in 2005, throwing for 1,603 yards and 25 touchdowns with only three interceptions…An excellent running quarterback, he also rushed for 1,339 yards and 24 scores during his senior year, earning first-team All-American honors from Parade and EA Sports…That year, he was also named the Class 3A state Player of the Year by the Associated Press and Seattle Times, adding first-team All-State honors from both organizations…In the 2005 Washington 3A state title game, he had four touchdowns and 272 total yards in a 47-12 win over Prosser High School…Helped Ferndale to a seventh place ranking in USA Today's final West Region rankings, and the team ranked 12th in MaxPreps.com's final national rankings…Also a standout pitcher and outfielder on the baseball diamond, as he was named the 3A State Player of the Year in 2006.

PERSONAL
History major…Academic All-Pac-10 honorable mention in 2007…Chose to attend Washington over scholarship offers from Arizona State, Cal, Oregon, Oregon State, Stanford, Tennessee, Southern California and Washington State…Drafted in the 40th round of the 2006 Major League Baseball draft by the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, as the Angels again selected him in the tenth round of the 2009 draft as an outfielder, signing him to a six-year contract that included a $300,000 signing bonus…Father, Scott, and uncles, Mike, John and Patrick all played football at Western Washington University, where Patrick still holds the career total yardage record...Patrick, the Player of the Century at Western Washington after gaining 4,049 yards in his career, was introduced by Jake during his induction into the Pacific Northwest Football Hall of Fame in 2008…Has two sisters, Alyssa and Erika…Cousin, Casey, is currently a safety on the Washington State football team…Another cousin, Brady, was a teammate on the Bellingham Bells baseball team…Born 6/15/88…Resides in Ferndale, Washington.

Want more in-depth coverage on your favorite NFL team? Click here and get started today.

VikingUpdate.com Recommended Stories