Bond sale back on, stadium workers to be paid

Metrodome (Brace Hemmelgarn/USA TODAY)

With the bond sale to raise revenue for the state's portion of stadium construction back on, workers who have been dismantling the Metrodome and moving earth around it will be getting paid.

With the legal challenges to Minnesota's bonding for the new Vikings stadium out of the way after being rejected by the Minnesota Supreme Court, plans are set for the state to sell $468 million in general fund appropriation-backed bonds Monday.

The sale was initially set for Jan. 13-14, but a legal challenge to the bond sale delayed the proceedings until the High Court of the state could make a decision whether to hear the case – which would have likely delayed the bond sale for weeks, if not months, and set back the timetable for project completion.

Concerns were raised because, as anyone who attended the last game at the Metrodome or has driven by the dome site knows, it's clear that work is ongoing. Part of the bond money will go toward paying the labor force that has moved earth around the stadium, deflated the roof and begun dismantling the building. Until the bonds are sold, those contractors aren't being paid. Once the work began, any significant delay could have caused integral problems with the project. But with the bonds cleared for sale Monday – barring a last-minute appeal to an anti-stadium judge this weekend or early Monday morning – those who have completed work on the stadium and those who are going to be descending on the Metrodome site will be paid and the new home of the Vikings will start taking shape.

With the anti-stadium voices continuing to be shot down by the legal system, the stadium construction appears to be back on track. As part of the project, the Wilf family is kicking in $477 million out of the corporate checkbook. Nobody seems to be complaining about that contribution to the stadium effort.

SATURDAY NOTES

  • On the syndicated radio show The David Pakman Show, former Vikings punter Chris Kluwe said that, if investigators don't agree with his allegations of homophobic slurs being made by Vikings special teams coordinator Mike Priefer, he will sue the Vikings – apparently for wrongful termination. Kluwe met with investigators on Friday and told Viking Update in a text that he "cooperated fully" but didn't want to comment further until the investigation is over to "respect the integrity of the process."

  • Former Vikings defensive coordinator Alan Williams was hired to Jim Caldwell's staff in Detroit. Williams is the second former defensive coordinator Caldwell has added to his staff of assistants. New linebackers coach Bill Sheridan was the defensive coordinator with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers before Greg Schiano rubbed a fan base the wrong way.


    John Holler has been writing about the Vikings for more than a decade for Viking Update. Follow Viking Update on Twitter and discuss this topic on our message boards. To become a subscriber to the Viking Update web site or magazine, click here.
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